Fire Season Regulations

Fire season is in effect on lands protected by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry's Southwest Oregon District. The fire danger level is "moderate" (blue) and the Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) is 1 (one). [Note: the fire danger level will rise to "high" (yellow) on Thursday, June 30. IFPL 1 will remain in effect.]

The fire prevention regulations now in effect include:
  • No debris burning in piles or in burn barrels;
  • No fireworks on forestlands;
  • Tracer ammunition and exploding targets may not be used on forestlands or in any other wildland area;
  • Sky lanterns are disallowed.
At 12:01 a.m. on Thursday, June 30, the following additional fire prevention regulations take effect:
  • Campfires will be allowed only in designated campgrounds. Portable stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels may be used in other locations;
  • Motorized vehicles will be allowed only on improved roads;
  • Smoking while traveling will be allowed only in enclosed vehicles on improved roads;
  • Possession of the following firefighting equipment is required while traveling, except on state highways, county roads and driveways: one shovel and one gallon of water or one 2½ pound or larger fire extinguisher. All-terrain vehicles and motorcycles must be equipped with one 2½ pound or larger fire extinguisher;
  • Chain saws may not be used between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. During other hours, chain saw users must have an ax, a shovel and an 8-oz or larger fire extinguisher at the job site, and a one-hour fire watch is required after the saw is shut down;
  • Mowing of dead or dry grass with power-driven equipment will not be allowed between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. This restriction does not include mowing of green lawns, or equipment used for the commercial culture and harvest of agricultural crops;
  • The cutting, grinding or welding of metal will not be allowed between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. These activities will be allowed during other hours provided the work site is cleared of potentially flammable vegetation and other materials, and a water supply is at the job site;
  • Electric fence controllers must be approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories Inc., or be certified by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, and be installed and used in compliance with the fence controller’s instructions for fire safe operation.
In the Wild & Scenic Section of the Rogue River between Grave Creek and Marial:
  • Smoking is prohibited while traveling, except in boats on the water, and on sand or gravel bars that lie between water and high water marks that are free of vegetation.
  • All travelers are required to carry one shovel and a one-gallon or larger bucket.
  • The use of fireworks is prohibited.
  • Campfires, including cooking fires and warming fires, are prohibited. However, charcoal fires for cooking and built in raised fire pans are allowed on sand or gravel bars that lie between water and high water marks that are free of vegetation. Ashes must be hauled out. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels may also be used.
Under Industrial Fire Precaution Level 1 (one), fire tools and a water supply must be located on the job site, and watchman service must be provided.

The district protects 1.8 million acres of state, private, county, city and Bureau of Land Management forestlands in Jackson and Josephine counties.
For more information, contact the ODF Southwest Oregon District unit offices:

5286 Table Rock Rd.
Central Point, OR 97502
(
541) 664-3328
Fax: (541) 664-4340
5375 Monument Dr.
Grants Pass, OR 97526
(541) 474-3152
Fax: (541) 474-3158
Links to related information

Oregon Department of Forestry fire prevention regulations:
Weather conditions and forecasts:
To report a fire: Dial 911. Be prepared to tell the dispatcher who you are, where the fire is located, and how to contact you. Do not hang up until the dispatcher asks you to. For more information about emergency reporting, see the Emergency Communications of Southern Oregon website.
 
To ensure you'll know about an emergency in your area: Sign up for Citizen Alert, a Jackson County notification system which helps local officials to provide you with critical information quickly when a fire, flood, earthquake or other emergency occurs.
 
For wildfire prevention regulations on other southern Oregon state and private forestlands:

For information about wildfires in the Pacific Northwest: Northwest Interagency Coordination Center
 
For national wildfire information:
For information about local national forests:

23 comments:

  1. It's cold and damp outside. How do you expect anyone to take you seriously when you say the fire danger is "high"? I don't think you could start a forest fire today if you have a flame thrower!

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    1. it's comments like this, is why we have rules.....

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  2. The lands protected by ODF's Southwest Oregon District, which includes state, private, county and BLM forestlands in Jackson and Josephine counties, have not had enough rainfall recently to change the fire danger level. The region is in a period of warmer than normal and drier than normal weather. As long as this weather pattern persists, the risk of wildfires remains high.

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  3. I've lived in so. Or. Long enough to know a flamethrower would easily start a big fire! People like that should move to the city, so folks like myself should not have to worry! My 13 acres borders BLM on the west side. Everyone, please be careful. R.T.

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  4. When is it cleared to ride OHV on trails?

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  5. You can ride on OHV trails now. The restriction on driving off of improved ends was removed on Oct. 19.

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  6. Are we allowed to use our wood stoves?

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  7. You may use a wood stove. Typically, the Oregon Department of Forestry's fire prevention regulations don't apply to wood-burning stoves and fireplaces inside of a residence.

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  8. Is there a list on this web page, that I can down load, of prohibited items in a out door burn pile???

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  9. Yes, there is a list of things you're not supposed to burn at http://www.deq.state.or.us/aq/burning/openburning/openburn.asp.

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  10. We are new to Coos County. We want to be sure we are responsible citizens. We want to build an indoor wood burning forge on our 2 acre property. Does anyone know what we need to do to make sure we are in compliance

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  11. We are new to coos county and want to set up an indoor wood burning forge on our 2 acre property. We want to follow all regulations. Can you tell me what we need to do permit wise and is there a special chimney that's required?

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  12. MKB: I recommend that you contact the Coos Forest Protective Association in Coos Bay, 541-267-3161. Information here on swofire.com applies only to ODF-protected lands in Jackson and Josephine counties.

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  13. When do for restrictions for burning outdoors begin this spring 2016? I have a ceremonial sweat lodge where I live in Williams and we were thinking of holding a ceremony this coming Friday, 6/3. We of course enlist safe fire practices such as dampening the areas surrounding the fire pit and having a large reserve water tank on site. Any info would be helpful.

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    1. Fire season will begin June 3, so you'll need a permit from the ODF Grants Pass Unit office, (541) 474-3152.

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  14. How about warming fires in fire pits that are surrounded by adequate gravel or mineral earth? or fires in back yards in concrete fire pits on concrete patios?

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  15. Right now there are no restrictions on warming fires in backyards. The fire season regulations that go into effect June 3 focus on burn piles -- piles of tree branches and other woody debris from landscaping and brush reduction work. Later in the summer, when the fire danger goes to "high," a permit from ODF is needed for campfires outside of campgrounds, and for warming fires, cooking fires and ceremonial fires.

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  16. Are exploding targets and shooting allowed on Industrial timber land that are surrounded by BLM land, or are there restrictions? We live on wooded land nearby and are concerned that people will start fires or a bullet will hit someone. They are often shooting from a ridge or alongside a road.

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    1. Exploding targets and tracer ammo are not allowed on private industrial forestland, BLM land, county- or state-owned forestland, or any other private lands within ODF's protection district. Target shooting without tracer ammo or exploding targets is allowed, but shooters using steel-jacketed ammo need to be aware that sparks can be caused by this ammo if it strikes metal or rock.

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  17. are there any time limitations for lawnmower-weed eater-chain saw use now?

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    1. Currently, there are no restrictions on the use of mowers, brush and weed cutters and chain saws with internal combustion engines. Once the fire danger level rises to "high," there will be a shut-down time.

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  18. are there any restrictions for the use of mowers and weed eaters now

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    1. Not right now, but there will be restrictions on power equipment use as the fire danger level goes up.

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