Saturday, August 22, 2015

Potlucks and Sparkplugs: Firewise Success Catches on in Upper Cow Creek

Residents of Upper Cow Creek Rd with IMT 2 Steve Bowen.
Southern Oregon is wildfire country. In the last five years about one-third of the 325,000-acre Tiller Ranger District has been blackened by wildfire. This year, the Stouts Creek Fire has already burned over 25,000 and was 82 percent contained on August 22, 2015. Locals here know about living with wildfire. They have learned that adapting to wildfire means getting to know your neighbors and that potlucks are the perfect place talk about being a fire-adapted community.

When the Stouts Creek Fire was threatening homes east of the community of Azalea, fire managers were pleased to learn that Milo, Tiller, and Upper Cow Creek Road were designated FireWise Communities. Being Firewise means homeowners have taken significant steps to make their homes defensible from a wildfire. After several years of hard work, 14 homes and several roads including Upper Cow Creek Rd have defensible space and have joined the dozen other recognized FireWise communities in Douglas County.

The maxim of many hands makes light work applies. Grant resources, program support and technical assistance came from the Douglas Forest Protective Association, the Umpqua National Forest, Douglas County Public Works, the Phoenix Charter School and others. At the grassroots level, neighbors did not just come together on their own. There was a spark, a catalyst, someone who overcame the inertia and fostered change. That person was Kathy Staley of Upper Cow Creek Rd.

Kathy Staley, community sparkplug.
“The Umpqua National Forest is part of our community,” said Kathy Staley. “Donna Owens, Tiller District Ranger, made it easy for us. We hold regular potlucks and Donna and her staff began attending. As we got to know one another we naturally broadened our circle of care to include those who work for the Forest Service,” she explained.

“Prior to these gatherings, the relationship with the Umpqua NF was often adversarial. It helped that Ranger Owens was willing to say the tough but honest things,” Staley said. “That built trust in the eyes of the community members.”

Clearly motivated, Kathy explained that her career as an engineering inspector gave her a sharp and critical eye.

“I saw a need,” she explained. “I’m relatively new to the community. We learned that there were grants available to help pay for removing the brush and small trees to make our homes safer from wildfire,” she said. The grant funds and other monies helped pay for road crews removing roadside brush.

“Red Apple Road used to be tight with brush,” explained Kathy Pack of Upper Cow Creek Road. “It made me nervous thinking about driving it during a wildfire. Getting the roads and houses cleared of brush out really gave me piece of mind,” she said.

Defensible space around the home of Jim and Kathy Pack.
Once the neighbors learned that they could meet their commitment by contributing their time, the idea spread like creamy peanut butter. Using the county’s road crew and students from the Phoenix Charter School, they were able conduct defensible space activities at more than a dozen homes—removing brush and small trees and pruning up the branches on larger trees to make the homes safer from wildfire.

“We’ve owned this piece of land for 30 years,” said Jim Pack. “I planted all the trees myself and each one has a name. This place is a dream come true for me. Making it safer from wildfire was just something we had to do. We have too much at stake to live with the risk of it burning.”

Just as local residents gave their time, staff from the Tiller Ranger District understood they had to do the same. “The relationship building just took time,” said Terry Brown, Fire Management Officer, Tiller Ranger District. “The relationships we have with the community are the most valuable results from this process.”

The Douglas Forest Protective Association formed the third leg of the FireWise stool. FireWise Coordinator Dennis Sifford advises communities on becoming FireWise.

“The program helps make homeowners aware of the risks and teaches them about the little things they can do to help their homes survive a wildfire,” said Dennis.

Wildfire is a frequent visitor to southern Oregon. Building resilience and adapting to wildfire depends on knowing your neighbors, widening the circle of care and finding the catalysts in the community who can make things happen. In these Firewise communities, these grass roots efforts have clearly paid off.

“When I learned that the residents of Upper Cow Creek Road were designated FireWise, I was more confident that we could protect the homes and that our firefighters would come home safely,” explained Steve Bowen, Structural Liason for the Stouts Creek Fire.

By: Stouts Creek Fire Information Team

Helpful Links:
http://www.dfpa.net
http://www.firewise.org
http://www.fs.usda.gov/umpqua

Friday, August 21, 2015

Stouts Creek Fire Crews Complete Burnout Projects

After three weeks of hard dangerous work, crews now have the Stouts Creek Fire fully encircled with a blackline—when the fire’s edge has burnt to a road or other fireline and is secure. Last night, fire crews completed burn out operations on the last piece of the 51-mile fire perimeter. Reaching this milestone has been the fire crews’ focus for the past week.

“I feel really good about where we are at,” said John Pellisier Operations Section Chief. “I was able to sleep easy last night knowing that we have this thing cinched up.”

While the mood at morning briefing was upbeat, fire managers reminded crews to be vigilant and stay focused on the work ahead. “Yes, we have a blackline around this fire. That’s great. And we still have lots of work to do,” said Incident Commander Chris Cline. “We need to stay focused and make sure our lines hold as the weather heats back up in coming days.”

The day shift will focus on burning interior patches of unburnt fuels near the southern tip of the fire. These operations will produce smoke for at least a couple more days. Once the burnout is secured, the evacuation level on Upper Cow Creek Road will be reduced. Until then, the evacuation levels remain unchanged.

A Level 2 Evacuation notice (Get Set) remains in place for residents on Upper Cow Creek Road east of Devils Flat to the end of the road. This precautionary measure is because of high temperatures and low humidities that might cause increased fire behavior. The Stouts Creek Fire has blackened 26,188 acres and is 80% contained and still has the potential for rapid growth. A contingency plan to protect structures on Upper Cow Creek is in place and will be activated if needed. Evacuation levels for all other areas remain at Level 1 (Get Ready).

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

There are 764 personnel assigned to the fire with 11 crews, 19 engines, 25 water tenders, 13 bulldozers and six helicopters. To date, the Stout Creek Fire has cost $33.3 million.

The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 46% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 54% on the Umpqua National Forest.

Collier Butte Fire 30 Percent Contained

Location: Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, 18 miles east of Gold Beach
Incident Commander: Doug Johnson
Information Center: 541-247-4447
Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4461Email: collierbuttefire@gmail.com
Facebook: U.S. Forest Service-Rogue River - Siskiyou National Forest
Oregon Smoke Information: http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com/

The Curry County Fairgrounds in Gold Beach will host the Fair August 27-30 as planned. The Collier Butte Fire incident command post will be moving to the Gold Beach High School Saturday to make room for the Fair set-up.

Current Situation:
9,000 acres
30% Containment
415 Personnel
5 Crews
5 Dozers
2 Helicopters
8 Water Tenders
11 Engines

With firelines in place on the north, west and south flanks, firefighters will focus on securing containment lines by burning fuel along the fire’s edge and interior pockets within the fire perimeter. Burnout operations will also focus on the containment line between Big Craggies and the Collier Butte vicinities, and will begin only if favorable weather conditions exist. A helicopter equipped with an aerial ignition device is available to assist ground personnel by burning areas that are difficult to access.

Helicopters will shuttle crews into the Wilderness to assist in containing burnout operations. Portable water pumps and hoses remain in place to provide water support, and two heavy lift helicopters stationed in Agness will be available to drop water.

Crews and engines will continue mop up operations to extinguish burning and smoldering vegetation along the fire edge. Firefighters will improve secondary and contingency lines by falling hazard trees and removing excess fuels. These precautionary lines extend north from Forest Road 3318 to the Illinois River and south along Forest Road 1376 to the Chetco River. The fire continues spreading east into remote, inaccessible land in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, yet remains west of the Illinois River.

Nationally, the wildfire situation remains at a critical level. All available firefighting resources are being called upon to assist, resulting in a shortage of fire crews, helicopters and support personnel. Firefighters are being reassigned to more-critical incidents to protect lives, homes and infrastructure. On the Collier Butte Fire, managers are strategically positioning available resources to focus on holding and securing containment lines, and coordinating aircraft use with other fires in southwest Oregon.

Rugged, steep terrain and an abundance of snags present challenges to firefighter safety. Due to a shortage of firefighting resources and limited wilderness access, management of this wildfire is likely to continue for an extended period. Smoke from the fire may be visible at the times throughout the remainder of the fire season.

Businesses along the south coast and Rogue River remain open and welcome visitors. Residents and visitors to Gold Beach, Brookings and nearby communities are encouraged to drive carefully as firefighter traffic has increased in the area. The public is encouraged to use caution outdoors, as extreme drought conditions persist. Fuels are receptive to any type of spark or flame. For information on closures on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, please see the Facebook page or the Inciweb page listed above.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Fire Prevention Reminder: Power-Driven Machinery Shutdown is in Effect

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Southwest Oregon District imposed a complete shutdown August 1 on public use of power-driven machinery. This shutdown includes any equipment that uses a petroleum fuel-powered, spark-emitting engine. The list of equipment this restriction affects is long, but it includes chain saws, brush cutters, mowers and generators.

This restriction does not apply to cutting irrigated green grass, or to machinery used for the commercial culture or harvest of agricultural crops. It also does not apply to industrial activities, which are currently regulated under Industrial Fire Precaution Level III (three).

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Southwest Oregon District protects 1.8 million acres of state, private, county, and Bureau of Land Management lands in Jackson and Josephine counties. Fire season regulations also apply in county, state and BLM day-use areas and campgrounds.

For more information about the Oregon Department of Forestry’s fire season regulations, please call or visit the Southwest Oregon District unit office nearest to you:

  • Medford Unit, 5286 Table Rock Rd., Central Point. (541) 664-3328
  • Grants Pass Unit, 5375 Monument Dr., Grants Pass. (541) 474-3152

Oregon State Parks Bans Campfires

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is prohibiting all campfires in Oregon State Parks and other properties owned and managed by the department beginning Aug. 19 at 10 a.m. The ban includes but is not limited to designated fire pits, tiki torches and candles. The ban also extends to fires on ocean beaches.

"Our goal is to avoid any accidental fires on OPRD property that would further tax limited firefighting resources," said MG Devereux, OPRD Deputy Director. "Most communities have sent local firefighters and equipment to help with wildfires throughout the state. An unintentional fire in a state park would add an unnecessary burden to firefighting efforts."

The state park ban doesn't apply to propane stoves and/or charcoal briquettes for cooking, but there may be local fire restrictions that do limit propane stoves and briquettes. Visitors planning a trip should check with park staff for the most current information, or by calling the state park information line at (800) 551-6949 or visiting www.oregonstateparks.org.

This ban will remain in effect for at least one week and will be re-evaluated based on fire status, weather, and guidance from state and local fire officials.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Burnouts and Fireline Construction Nearly Complete on Stouts Creek Fire

Crews on the Stouts Creek Fire are nearing the goal of encircling the fire with containment lines. Last night, fire crews burned out another small chunk of the fireline, leaving less than one-half mile of fireline to be completed. Once this is accomplished there will be 51 miles of fireline around this fire.

“We are very close to closing this gap and having this fire fully lined. We are getting close to connecting the firelines at the south end of the fire” said John Pellisier Operation Section Chief for the Oregon Department of Forestry.

With firefighting forces focused on the southern end of the fire the Incident Commander reminded fire crews to remain vigilant throughout the day as temperatures climb and conditions change.

“Today we will hold and strengthen our containment lines and, when the time is right, we will close the gap,” said Chris Cline, Incident Commander for ODF Team 2.

Fire weather forecasters predict today will not be as hot and dry as yesterday, however fire conditions are still extreme. As long as the inversion remains above the fire, fire activity will be low and smoke will persist. Crews will continue to patrol the fireline and mop-up any hot spots.

A Level 2 Evacuation notice (Get Set) remains in place for residents on Upper Cow Creek Road east of Devils Flat to the end of the road. This precautionary measure is because of high temperatures and low humidities that may cause increased fire behavior. The Stouts Creek Fire is 74% contained and still has the potential for rapid growth. A contingency plan to protect structures on Upper Cow Creek has been put into place and will be activated if needed. Evacuation levels for all other areas remain unchanged.

Even though personnel and equipment are needed on other fires, fire managers are keeping the resources required to meet the goals of fire containment and resource protection.

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

The fire has burned 25,324 acres and is 74% contained. There are 1,010 personnel assigned to the fire with 17 crews, 22 engines, 25 water tenders, 14 bulldozers and eight helicopters.

To date, the Stout Creek Fire has cost $31.4 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 48% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 52% on the Umpqua National Forest.

Collier Butte Fire is 8,000 Acres and 25 Percent Contained

The Collier Butte Fire is estimated at 8,000 acres, 25 percent contained and staffed with 385 personnel. The fire is burning in the northwest region of the Kalmiopsis Wilderness and remote Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest System lands on the Gold Beach Ranger District. Fire managers have implemented direct and indirect containment lines to protect values at risk located to the south, west, and north of the fire. Rugged, steep terrain and abundant snags present a multitude of challenges to firefighter safety. Management of this fire is likely to endure for an extended period due to the shortage of firefighting resources and the limited access in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness.

Firefighters plan to burnout along Forest Road 3680 in order to strengthen the fireline. A smoke inversion is expected again today delaying burnout operations until afternoon. Winds are expected to be light from the northeast, switching to northwest later in the day. Firefighters will patrol and mop-up containment lines and watch for possible reburn due to falling tree needles accumulating in recently burned areas. Fuels reduction and chipping will take place along Forest Road 3318 today and along dozer line in the southern portion of the fire.

There are approximately 100 uncontained large fires in the nation resulting in a scarcity of resources. Crews, aircraft and qualified support personnel are in high demand and short supply. High-priority values at risk on other fires are in need of vast numbers of resources to protect lives, homes and infrastructure. Firefighting resources are being reassigned and moved to protect these values. Collier Butte Fire managers are strategically positioning available resources to focus on holding and securing primary and alternate containment lines. Additionally, aviation managers are coordinating the sharing of aircraft with other fires in southwest Oregon.

Closures:
Businesses along the south coast and Rogue River remain open and welcome visitors. Residents and visitors to Gold Beach, Brookings and nearby communities are encouraged to drive carefully as firefighter traffic in the area has increased.

The Curry County Fair in Gold Beach will take place Aug. 27-30 as planned.

Sky Lanterns Not Allowed During Fire Season on ODF-Protected Lands

Fire season in southwest Oregon continues to be extraordinarily hot and dry, and the Oregon Department of Forestry is committed to reducing the number of human-caused fires in forests and other wildland areas in Jackson and Josephine counties.

Releasing sky lanterns during fire season is one activity that is not allowed on ODF-protected lands. Fire season began June 5.

A sky lantern is commonly made of a lighted candle suspended beneath a plastic bag. The heat rising from the candle inflates the bag, which floats away and eventually returns to earth. If the lighted candle comes in contact with dry vegetation, a wildfire is likely to start.

The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Southwest Oregon District protects 1.8 million acres of state, private, county, and Bureau of Land Management lands in Jackson and Josephine counties. Fire season regulations also apply in county, state and BLM day-use areas and campgrounds.

For more information about the Oregon Department of Forestry’s fire season regulations, please call or visit the Southwest Oregon District unit office nearest to you:

  • Medford Unit, 5286 Table Rock Rd., Central Point. (541) 664-3328
  • Grants Pass Unit, 5375 Monument Dr., Grants Pass. (541) 474-3152

IFPL 4 Takes Effect Saturday on Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

The Industrial Fire Precaution Level (IFPL) will increase to IFPL IV (four) on Saturday, August 22, 2015, at 12:01 a.m. for the entire Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.

On Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands in Jackson and Josephine counties, IFPL III (three) is in effect.

Under IFPL IV, known as “General Shutdown”, all industrial actions are prohibited. This includes any personal and commercial use, firewood permits, power saws, and yarding.

Public use restrictions remain in effect, limiting the use of campfires to fire rings within designated campgrounds. No fires are permitted in wilderness. Current Public Use and Wilderness Restrictions can be found at http://www.oregon.gov/odf/pages/fire/precautionlevelmap.aspx

For more information, contact the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest at (541) 618-2200. For current information on IFPL levels, visit the Medford Interagency Communications Center website at http://ormic.org/fire_danger.shtml. Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest fire prevention regulations are posted online at www.fs.usda.gov/rogue-siskiyou

Please contact your local Ranger District office for more information and maps prior to travel on National Forest lands:

  • Supervisor’s Office, Medford, (541) 618-2200
  • Gold Beach Ranger District, (541) 247-3600
  • High Cascades Ranger District
    • Prospect, (541) 560-3400
    • Butte Falls, (541) 865-2700
  • Powers Ranger District, (541) 439-6200
  • Siskiyou Mountains Ranger District (541) 899-3800
  • Wild Rivers Ranger District
    • Grants Pass, (541) 471-6500
    • Cave Junction, (541) 592-4000

Avoid Target Shooting in Dry Grass


Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Fire Danger Rises to Extreme in Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

As persistent dry conditions continue across southwest Oregon, the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest is moving to “Extreme” fire danger, effective immediately.

Fire agencies in southwest Oregon are urging caution for all those participating in outdoor activities this season. Just one small spark from an unattended fire, muzzle of a gun, or the hot exhaust pipe on a vehicle can ignite fine fuels.

Current information on the National Creek Complex and the Collier Butte Fire, both burning on the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, is available online at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/. Additional online resources for fire conditions and fire information are available at http://ormic.org/.

For more information on current fire restrictions, call (541) 618-2200.

Remember: Campfires Are Only Allowed in Designated Campgrounds



As the sun sets on your outdoor family vacation, a campfire is a great place for sharing your adventure over a melting marshmallow on stick. Whether you’re cooking, warming up, or just sitting and enjoying the crackle and glow, campfire safety is a must. Before you light that fire here are a few campfire tips:

Building a Safe Campfire

  • Build your campfire only in a fire pit inside of a state or county campground. These campgrounds have been approved by the Oregon Department of Forestry for campfires.
  • Before you light your fire, be prepared to extinguish it later – have a bucket of water at hand. Never leave a fire unattended.
  • Keep your fire small – it will be easier to contain and faster to extinguish.
  • Never leave a campfire unattended. Never leave children alone with a campfire.

Putting Out a Campfire

  • Keep plenty of water handy for a quick response if the fire were to escape.
  • Drown the fire with water making sure all embers, coals, and sticks are wet. If it is too hot to touch then it is too hot leave.
  • Use a shovel, stir water and dirt into your campfire to make sure everything is wet and cold to the touch. Carefully run the back of your hand near the surface of the fire remains to double check all heat is gone.

National Creek Complex Info

For up-to-date info on the National Creek Complex, see National Creek Complex blog and Facebook page.

Crater Lake National Park has closed the north entrance road between State Highway 138 at the park’s north boundary and Crater Lake west rim drive at north junction. This precautionary closure will facilitate fire operations and provide for the safety of firefighters and park visitors. A segment of the Pacific Crest Trial is also closed from the park north boundary to the junction with Lightning Springs Trail.

Yesterday’s Activities: The size of the National Fire remains unchanged as crews continued to search for and extinguish hot spots near containment lines. Firefighters are preparing existing Forest Service roads to be used for containment lines west of the National Fire should they be needed for the Crescent Fire. Other crews constructed hand fire lines perpendicular to and south of Highway 230 to create opportunities for checking the spread of the fire.

The Crescent Fire increased by over 500 acres yesterday. Crews also responded to and suppressed another spot fire north of Highway 230.

Today’s Activities: Fire crews will continue to improve State Highway 230 for use as a containment line west of the fire. Burn out operations may begin at the north eastern part of the fire. Crews will also continue to improve or remove dead trees along the north park entrance road further south in anticipation of the fire pushing to the east. A structure protection group, supported by initial attack resources, is working in the Diamond Lake area to protect structures.
Weather: Warmer and drier temperatures are expected today and are predicted to increase during the next few days. The relative humidity is expected to be near 15 – 19% this afternoon with no substantial winds.

The weather on Tuesday and Wednesday is expected to create very active fire behavior conditions. An inversion layer has been mitigating the fire intensity for the past few days on the northern part of the fire by trapping smoke near the ground level and shading vegetation. These conditions are expected to change and with better air ventilation, an increase in fire behavior will occur.

Closures & Evacuations: Crater Lake National Park has closed the north park entrance and a larger section of the Pacific Crest Trail, north of the lake. The remainder of the park is open. Area closure orders have been issued for the Rogue River-Siskiyou and Umpqua National Forests near Diamond Lake. Maps and descriptions of the trail and area closures are online at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4463/.

State Highway 230 is closed (ODOT Tripcheck). There are trail closures in the National Park and on the Rogue River-Siskiyou and Umpqua National Forest.

Diamond Lake Area is under a Stage 1 Evacuation Notice; the “ready” stage in “ready, set, go”.

Hot, Dry Weather Prompts Level 2 Evacuation Advisory on Stouts Creek Fire's South End

This fire is not 100 percent contained and still has the potential to grow rapidly, therefore residents in the Upper Cow Creek east of Devils Flat to the end of the road are advised that the evacuation level has been raised to a Level 2 (Get Set). This is a precautionary measure is due to high temperatures and low humidities.

At approximately 7:00 pm tonight fire crews will take advantage of weather conditions and topography to conduct a burnout operation along the established bulldozer lines in the southeast portion of the fire. This area has been prepared well in advance for this operation.

During day operations crews were assisted by heavy lift helicopters cooling hot spots and flare-ups as temperature steady rose throughout the day. The firing operation conducted on Sunday evening was highly successful; the fire continues to back away from containment lines and crews were able to mop up into the perimeter through the day.

Expected warmer and drier conditions on Tuesday will restrict any firing operation as the relative humidity will be in the low teens and temperatures will reach into the mid-eighties. Existing lines will be tested and fire crews will need to remain vigilant as interior burning will be more active. There is a greater probability of embers being carried aloft as the fire burns more intensive. While fire managers are confident, they have a plan to deal with contingencies and have the ground forces and helicopters to attack any fire that escapes.

Throughout the night, patrols will continue monitoring the firelines on the west, north and east sides and addressing any flare ups that are encountered.

Even though resources are needed on other fires, fire managers are keeping as many resources as needed to maintain the integrity of completing the objectives.

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

The fire has blackened 24,756 acres and remains 70% contained. There are 1,120 personnel assigned to the fire with 27 crews, 23 engines, 20 water tenders, 19 bulldozers and 9 helicopters.

To date the Stout Creek Fire has cost $29.5 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 48% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 52% on the Umpqua National Forest.

Monday, August 17, 2015

Helicopter Pilot's View of a Bucket Drop

Using a helicopter to drop buckets of water on a wildfire is very helpful to firefighters. This video is taken from the pilot's perspective, a view most people don't get.


New Pocketcard and Fire Statistics Sheet

This week will be extremely hot and dry as we reach again into triple digit territory. ERC values will continue in the extreme category and we will likely reach new maximums with the forecast of hot weather. Fire activity on the ground has increased and extra resources have been required several times. For the latest fire statistics and pocketcard please visit swofiredata.com.

Burnout Operations Along Firelines Continue on Stouts Creek Fire

Sunday’s preparation for the burnout operations allowed the night crews to continue what was started late in the afternoon. Overnight crews working on the southwest side of the fire, from DP 69 to Newman’s Gap, were able to make significant progress. Using established fireline, crews were able to use low-intensity burn methods to widen the line as much as 50-75 yards. The day shift will continue these efforts to build and strengthen this line.

With warming temperatures and lowering humidity, fire activity has the potential to increase. Because of these conditions, crews will continue monitoring the firelines on the west, north and east sides and address any flare ups that are encountered.

The Stouts Creek Fire has been managed under unified command by Oregon Department of Forestry Team 2 Incident Commander Chris Cline and Forest Service Incident Commander Mike Wilde, since August 13.

The fire has blackened 24,756 acres and 70% contained. There are 1,144 personnel assigned to the fire with 22 crews, 24 engines, 26 water tenders, 19 bulldozers and 6 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to assist with many of the other fires in the state and geographic area.

To date the Stout Creek Fire has cost $29.5 million. The Incident Management Team is protecting lands that are about 48% on state protected lands, which include BLM and private lands and 52% on the Umpqua National Forest